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Walt Disney's Rule: • If struggling to think clearly about a subject, draw it out. Here's Walt Disney's drawing he made in 1957 of the Media Empire he wanted to build. It's iconic. ![](https://pbs.twimg.com/media/Er23Bp-XAAQSLB_.jpg)

THREAD: 15 of the Most U...

@george__mack on Twitter

When designing a character, it’s often useful to think of them in terms of their theory of control. How have they learned to control the world? When unexpected change strikes, what’s their automatic go-to tactic for wrestling with the chaos? What’s their default, flawed response? The answer, as we’ve just seen, comes from that character’s core beliefs about reality, the precious and fiercely defended ideas around which they’ve formed their sense of self.

The Science of Storytelling

Will Storr

One in a million high-school-age students attended the high school that had the combination of cash and foresight to buy a computer. Bill Gates happened to be one of them. Gates is not shy about what this meant. “If there had been no Lakeside, there would have been no Microsoft,” he told the school’s graduating class in 2005. Gates is staggeringly smart, even more hardworking, and as a teenager had a vision for computers that even most seasoned computer executives couldn’t grasp. He also had a one in a million head start by going to school at Lakeside.

The Psychology of Money

Morgan Housel

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